May 30, 2015

Marder III

At the end of 1941 the German Army decided to mount the Soviet 7,6 cm anti-tank gun, which had been captured in vast quantity, on the open-topped chassis of the Panzer 38(t). The self-propelled antitank gun that emerged was designated the “Panzerjäger 38(t) für 7.62 cm PaK(r)” or the “Marder III”. In February 1943 the Marder III was improved by moving the main gun from the center of the vehicle to the rear, allowing the frontal armor plate on the hull to slope at a better angle. Furthermore the new version was fitted with the German 7.5 cm PaK 40/3 anti-tank gunAlthough the Marder III was an ad hoc effort of the German Army to deal with the newly appeared T-34 tank, and had numerous disadvantages, it served successfully until the end of the war.

1. Marder IIIs of the SS-Division “Leibstandarte”.


A Marder III of the 5th SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division “Wiking”
2. A Marder III of the 5th SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division “Wiking” in the Caucasus in August 1942.

A Chevrolet Panel van next  to an abandoned Marder III in North Africa
3. A Chevrolet Panel van of an Australian photographic unit next to
an abandoned Marder III in North Africa on February 9, 1943.

A Marder III of the 1st SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division  “Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler”
4. A Marder III of the 1st SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division
“Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler” in Kharkov in February 1943.

A column of Marder IIIs
5. A column of Marder IIIs in central Russia on June 21, 1943.

A captured Marder III
6. A captured Marder III operated by men of the 1st Royal Fusiliers in Italy on 30 December 1943.


Marder III Ausf. M Specifications
Weight
10,63 tons
Armor
0.2 - 0.79 in
Max Speed
25 mph
Range
118 miles
Crew
3
Armament
7.5 cm main gun, 7.92 mm MG



Bibliography
Green, Michael, Anderson, Thomas and Frank Schulz. German Tanks of World War II in Colour. Osceola, WI: MBI Publishing, 2000.
Sutherland, Jonathan. World War II Tanks and AFVs. London: Airlife Publishing, 2002.


Photo attribution
1. Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-297-1729-23/Kurth/CC BY-SA 3.0 de, via Wikimedia Commons
2. Bundesarchiv, Bild 101III-Moebius-117-27/Möbius/CC BY-SA 3.0 de, via Wikimedia Commons
3. Australian armed forces, via Wikimedia Commons
4. Bundesarchiv, Bild 101III-Roth-173-01/Roth, Franz/CC BY-SA 3.0 de, via Wikimedia Commons
5. Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-022-2944-23/Horster/CC BY-SA 3.0 de, via Wikimedia Commons
6. Hewitt (Sgt), No 2 Army Film & Photographic Unit, via Wikimedia Commons