May 1, 2015

Ludendorff Bridge

The Ludendorff Bridge (also known as the Bridge at Remagen) connected the town of Remagen on the west bank of the Rhine and the village of Erpel on the eastern bank. During WW II it was repeatedly bombed. On March 7, 1945 it was captured by the advancing U.S. Army, greatly assisting the Allied war effort. The German Army tried to destroy it with artillery rounds. Finally, on March 17, the bridge collapsed.

A side view of the Ludendorff Bridge
1. A side view of the Ludendorff Bridge.
The smoke is from German artillery rounds trying to destroy it.


A view of Ludendorff Bridge from the top of Erpeler Ley
2. A view of the Ludendorff Bridge from the top of Erpeler Ley, a steeply rising hill over 500 feet high.

A view of the Ludendorff Bridge
3. Another view of the bridge.

Poster printed by the US Army commemorating the capturing of the Ludendorff Bridge
4. A poster printed by the US Army commemorating the capturing of the Ludendorff Bridge.

A welder from the 1058th Bridge Construction and Repair Group repairs the Bridge after it was captured
5. A welder from the 1058th Bridge Construction and Repair Group
repairs the Bridge after it was captured.

CROSS THE RHINE WITH DRY FEET
6. “Cross the Rhine with dry feet courtesy of 9th Arm’d Div”

CROSS THE RHINE WITH DRY FEET
7. The 9th Armored Division has placed her sign at the entrance of the Ludendorff Bridge.

Men and equipment pour across the Bridge
8. Men and equipment pour across the Bridge on March 11, 1945.

The Bridge of Remagen

The Bridge four hours before it collapsed
9. The Bridge four hours before it collapsed into the Rhine.

The bridge after its collapse
10. The bridge after its collapse.

The bridge after its collapse
11.

The bridge after its collapse
12.

Pontoon bridge built after the collapse of the Ludendorff Bridge
13. Pontoon bridge built by the 291st Combat Engineers after the collapse of the Ludendorff Bridge.


Photos attribution
1. Claude Musgrove, U.S Army photographer, 164th Engineer Combat Battalion, via Wikimedia Commons
2., 3., 5. U.S. Army Signal Corps, National Archives, via Wikimedia Commons
4., 6., 7., 13.  US Army, via Wikimedia Commons
8. Camera Operator: Sgt. William Spangle, via Wikimedia Commons
9. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, via Wikimedia Commons
10., 11. Kameramann des Special Film Project 186 der United States Army Air Forces, Wikimedia Commons
12. http://www.archives.gov/research_room/arc/ Franklin D. Roosevelt Library & Museum